Why do we (Belgians) recycle batteries?

29
Mar

Why do we (Belgians) recycle batteries?

Fpr BEBAT we investigated the drivers and barriers to battery pack drop-off intention perceived by Belgian households. To this end, a standardized online survey, extending the framework provided by the Theory of Planned Behavior by incorporating measures on objective knowledge (i.e. knowledge that is true or false on recycling issues), the perception of the consequences (i.e. the degree to which they agree recycling battery packs has certain consequences), moral norms (i.e. the degree to which you feel that it would be immoral not to recycle), lack of habits (i.e. the degree to which you have developed routines other than the desired behavior), and the perceived effectiveness of BEBAT (i.e. the degree to which you think BEBAT is doing a good job), was made and taken from 1638 respondents. Data was collected during the 11/2014-01/2015 period and processed using partial least squares structural equation modelling. A moderate to strong R² of 0.62 was found, signaling that our model predicts the drop-off intention well. Based on the size of the path coefficients we can conclude that perceived behavioral control (i.e. the degree to which you feel able of performing the desired behavior), moral norm, and perceived consequences have the largest influence on the intention to drop-off battery packs to a BEBAT collection point as soon as they become unnecessary. Additionally, perceived policy effectiveness was found to negatively moderate the effect of subjective norm (i.e. the degree to which you feel pressured to carry out the desired behavior by society) on intention. A multi-group analysis revealed that significant differences exist between subgroups made by dividing the full sample based on an observed characteristic. Subgroups were made using the following features: bringing back the majority of battery packs (yes/no), education (high/low), pro-ecological worldview (high/low), gender (male/female), language (Dutch/French-speaking), living area (city/rural), and life stage (young adult/family with kids under 12/family with kids over 12/medior/senior). The characteristics causing most heterogeneity are: your ecological worldview (i.e. your general environmental attitude) and being in a family with kids under 12. Moreover, statistically significant differences in path coefficients are regularly found for the latent variables: objective knowledge, subjective norms, the lack of habit, moral norms, and consequences. The full study is available from the authors. For more information you can also contact sebastien.lizin@uhasselt.be.

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